NOTES FROM THE WINE CELLAR: 2015 BURGUNDIES

This article was originally published by John Mariani on the Virtual Gourmet.  http://www.johnmariani.com/archive/2018/180422/index.html

It’s said about California wines that the only reason to know the vintage date of a bottle is to figure out who made the wine at a particular winery, since the California weather is more stable than the position of winemaker, who are often “drafted and signed” by facilities like prized sports figures.
Whether that’s fact or merely witticism, the situation with the quality and quantity of wine from a particular vintage in France, particularly in Burgundy, is certainly more dependent on the vagaries of the year-to-year changes in weather, with the same winemaker at the same facility for long periods of time. With that in mind, the Wine Media Guild (a New York-based organization of professional wine communicators) sought to determine the quality of the 2015 vintage of Burgundy with a luncheon tasting at Manhattan’s Il Gattopardo of 14 whites and an equal number of  reds from a widespread range of Burgundian locales.
Overall, the consensus was that this was an excellent year for Burgundian wines, with the whites ready to drink now or in the next few years, since the climactic conditions generally produced ripe, full-flavored Chardonnay grapes with less acidity than found in a number of other recent harvests. On the other hand, these same weather conditions also allowed the Pinot Noir to ripen fully, yielding red wines best to consume a few years from now and expected to be quite long-lasting. Unfortunately, these days most good Burgundies are not geared to the faint of wallet, so in order to guide consumers about purchasing these wines, the following are my notes on what I considered the top ten bottles presented.

Whites

Château Fuissé Pouilly-Fuissé “Les Clos” Propriatire Récolant  ($64)—Made from Chardonnay grapes grown on a vineyard with vines dating to 1929, this wine had a bouquet and rich taste of apples and honey with notes of almonds and hints of apricots and orange in its long finish. It’s an ideal white to mate with risotto or roasted chicken.

Bouchard Père & Fils Chevalier Montrachet 1er Cru ‘La Cabotte’ ($560)—While a bit much for most pocketbooks, this memorable wine is aesthetically a cut or two above many of the 2015 white Burgundies. It has a distinctive bouquet and taste of pears with hints of marzipan and a touch of lime in its vibrant finish. Expect it to drink well with the likes of lobster, scallops, or tuna tartare for the next 5-10 years.

William Fèvre Chablis Grand Cru Bougros “Côte Bouguerots” ($98)—This full-bodied wine, with a bouquet and taste of peaches and citrus, has a crisp, fruity finish perfect to pair with seafare, especially grilled dorade or branzino.

Maison Joseph Drouhin, Chassagne Montrachet, 1er Cru “Les Embazées ($90)—Grapes for this wine hailed from vineyards noted for a complex soil of limestone and clay. Following harvest this wine was fermented using natural yeast and aged for 12 months in French oak barrels. It has a bouquet and taste of apples with undertones of honeysuckle and hazelnuts and should drink well over the next 10 years with ripe cheeses and grilled seafare, particularly swordfish or tuna.

Domaine Laroche 1er Cru Les Vaillons Vielles Vignes Chablis ($41)—Very well priced for a Premier Cru Chablis, this wine is made from grapes grown in a vineyard composed of fossilized oyster shells. It shows a bouquet and taste of apples and peaches with notes of apricots and zesty lemon in its finish. Unlike many 2015 Chablis, this wine contains enough acidity to age well and pairs perfectly with bivalves or shellfish.

 

Reds

Bouchard Père & Fils Nuits-St-George 1er Cru ‘Les Cailles’ ($108)—This wine shows a fragrant bouquet and taste of ripe berries, with hints of oak and earthy spices. And, while lighter in taste than many other Nuit-St-George reds, it harmoniously matches with lamb or veal and is expected to gain complexity with a few years of bottle age.

Domaine de Bellene, Beaune 1er Cru Cuvée Cinquantenaire ($90)—This blend of grapes from five different premier cru Beaune vineyards shows a bouquet and taste of plums with notes of ripe cherries and toasty oak. A bit young to drink now (although it marries well with grilled lamb or beef), expect this wine to become more complex and elegant with 5-10 years of bottle age.

Louis Latour Gevrey-Chambertin ($80)—Made from hand-picked Pinot Noir grown on 30-year-old vines in vineyards noted for chalk and limestone soil, this wine was aged for a year in oak barrels following fermentation. It has a distinct bouquet and taste of black currants with notes of anise and a smooth finish that mates well with grilled chicken or ripe cheeses.

Vincent Giradin, Santenay, Terre d’Enfance ($34)—A good bargain, this hand-harvested Pinot Noir grown in limestone-rich soil has a bouquet and taste of fresh strawberries and plums with hints of almonds in its smooth finish. It makes a good wine to match with summertime barbecue, especially grilled ribs, chicken or hamburgers.

Domaine Antonin Guyon, Savigny-Les-Beaunes ‘Les Goudelettes’ ($40)—This well-priced wine was made from hand-harvested Pinot Noir fermented over 15 days in open vats and aged in oak barrels (15% new) over 15 months. It shows a fruity bouquet and taste of ripe plums and blueberries with a long, smooth finish that matches well with duck or grilled pork.

 

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *